Wednesday, 20 November 2013

Just a few reasons I love old movies...

Some of my favourite lines from some of my favourite movies...


It Happened One Night 


Shapely: "Shapely sure knows how to pick em. Yes sir, Shapelys the name and that how i like to pick em.... What's the matter sister your not sayin' much?"

Ellie: "Seems to me your doing excellently without any assistance"

Shapely:"Well shut my big nasty mouth. Theres nothing that i like better than a high class momma that can snap back at ya. The cooler they are the hotter they get. Yes sir, when a cool momma gets hot boy how she sizzles."

I'm not sure if everyone else finds these lines as funny as my Mum and I but it gets me every time! Gotta love Shapely. 


The Philadelphia Story



Dinah: "Oh I wish something would happen! Nothing ever possibly in the least ever happens here!"

Tracey: "Put me in your pocket Mike."

Sabrina




Sabrina writing to her father from Paris: "I have learnt how to live... How to be In the world and Of the world, not just to stand aside and watch. And I will never, never again run away from life. Or from love, either..."

And my favourite introduction of all time...


Once upon a time,



 

                   

on the North Shore of Long Island,

some 30 miles from New York,



 

                   

there lived a small girl

on a large estate.



 

                   

The estate was very large indeed

and had many servants.



 

                   

There were gardeners

to take care of the gardens



 

                   

and a tree surgeon on a retainer.



 

                   

There was a boatman to put the boats

in the water in the spring



 

                   

and scrape their bottoms

in the winter.



 

                   

There were specialists

to take care of the grounds,



  

                   

the outdoor tennis court

and the indoor tennis court,



  

                   

the outdoor swimming pool

and the indoor swimming pool.



  

                   

And a man of no particular title



  

                   

took care ofa small pool in the

garden for a goldfish named George.



  

                   

Also on the estate there was

a chauffeur by the name of Fairchild,



  

                   

who had been imported from England

years ago,



  

                   

together with a new Rolls-Royce.



  

                   

Fairchild was a fine chauffeur

of considerable polish,



  

                   

Like the eight cars in his care.



  

                   

And he had a daughter

by the name of... Sabrina.



  

                   

It was the eve of

the annual six-metre-yacht races



  

                   

and, as had been traditional

for the past    years,



  

                   

the Larrabees were giving a party.



  

                   

It never rained on the night

of the Larrabee party.



  

                   

The Larrabees

wouldn't have stood for it.



  

                   

There were four Larrabees in all -

father, mother and two sons.



  

                   

Maude and Oliver Larrabee

were married in     .



  

                   

Among their many wedding presents

was a town house in New York



  

                   

and this estate for weekends.



  

                   

The town house has since been

converted into Saks Fifth Avenue.



  

                   

Linus Larrabee, the elder son,

graduated from Yale,



  

                   

where his classmates voted him



  

                   

the man most likely

to leave his alma mater$   million.



  

                   

His brother, David, went through

several of the best Eastern colleges



  

                   

for short periods of time,



  

                   

and through several marriages

for even shorter periods of time.



  

                   

He is now a successful

six-goal polo player



  

                   

and is listed on Linus's tax return

as a $    deduction.



  

                   

Life was pleasant among

the Larrabees,



  

                   

for this was as close to heaven

as one could get on Long Island.